SC instructs NGOs to contact the middle to crack down on Chinese language counterfeit credit score apps

The PIL was submitted by an NGO Save Them India Foundation and the petitioner was its chairman, Mr Praveen Kalaiselvan.

Through this petition, the petitioner took to court the problems raised by various mobile applications that were gaining popularity during the national lockdown period and attracting vulnerable users by offering loans with less formality.

The petitioner also highlighted how running such fake money-lending apps destroyed the lives of ordinary people.

The petitioner stated that the operation of such apps is harmful as it affects the security of the country and is also supported by Chinese companies.

The lawyer alleged that such microfinance apps are illegal and unauthorized as they do not meet the requirements set by the Reserve Bank of India.

At the suggestion of CJI to represent him before the relevant government agency, the petitioner requested judicial intervention as this concerned the security of the nation.

However, the court denied the petitioner’s request on the grounds that it was not a judicial matter.

The petitioner also provided information on the surveillance activities of the Chinese authorities against people in key positions in India such as prime ministers, judges, etc., based on a report published on the Indian Express.

The court rejected the petitioner’s objections and asked him to represent himself adequately before the ministry concerned.

The Supreme Court dismissed a PIL requesting action against the operation of counterfeit Chinese credit apps and instructed the petitioner to approach it with an appropriate representative before the Union Ministry.

The PIL was submitted by an NGO “Save Them India Foundation” and the petitioner was its chairman, Mr Praveen Kalaiselvan.

Through this petition, the petitioner took to court the problems raised by various mobile applications that were gaining popularity during the national lockdown period and attracting vulnerable users by offering loans with less formality.

The petitioner also highlighted how running such fake money-lending apps destroyed the lives of ordinary people.

The petitioner stated that the operation of such apps is harmful as it affects the security of the country and is also supported by Chinese companies.

The lawyer alleged that such microfinance apps are illegal and unauthorized as they do not meet the requirements set by the Reserve Bank of India.

At the suggestion of CJI to represent him before the relevant government agency, the petitioner requested judicial intervention as this concerned the security of the nation.

However, the court denied the petitioner’s request on the grounds that it was not a judicial matter.

The petitioner also provided information on the surveillance activities of the Chinese authorities against people in key positions in India such as prime ministers, judges, etc., based on a report published on the Indian Express.

The court rejected the petitioner’s objections and asked him to represent adequate representation before the relevant ministry.

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